Studebaker Buggy Rolls Into Museum.

Today we were finally able to add a “new” Studebaker buggy to the museum collection. We have been working for over a year to acquire the buggy, and we are very happy it has finally arrived. It is already on display and will shortly be restored to its original colors of black interior and seat, yellow exterior and red wheels and shafts. The buggy makes an interesting addition to the museum collection because Studebaker was among the few companies to make the transition from 19th to 20th Cent. transportation modes. The buggy joins our many other older buggies including two believed to be made at the Jaeger Buggy Shop of Bath, Ohio, and our several cars, trucks and tractors of the same era.
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The company began in 1852 when brothers Henry and Clement Studebaker opened a blacksmith shop in South Bend, Indiana. Later two younger brothers would join and they would build the business into the largest wagon and buggy maker in the United States.
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By the time the above ad ran in January of 1909, the company had already been experimenting with newer technology. In 1902, Thomas Edison bought the second electric car they assembled. The electrics were soon followed by a gasoline powered model in 1904.
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By 1920 Studebaker horse drawn buggy production would cease. Later on, in 1966, the Studebaker Automotive Company, known at the time as a style leader, was driven out of business by the bigger Detroit auto makers.
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