Newly Arrived Doctor in Town.

~From the Richfield Gazette.
.
“A new doctor has moved to Fryburg Village. Dr. Rielly, late of New Jersey, has moved his medical practice to Fryburg, seeking increased opportunities away from the bustle of the East Coast. He served with distinction during the recently successfully concluded war. He brings well-practiced skills in family medicine and field surgery. He attended medical schools in both New York & New Jersey and has an additional degree in dentistry from The Philadelphia Dental School in Pennsylvania.
We welcome him to our town. We have missed having a doctor, since Doc. Wagner’s recent passing. Doctor Rielly has established his practice in the former Abbyville School House, across from Fryburg Gen’l.¬†Welcome, Doc., to our town.”
.
~~~ I began collecting doctor equipment for the now established doctor office when the Summit County Historical Society donated a deaccessioned dentist chair. At about the same time I went to look at possibly moving a one-room schoolhouse over in Youngstown. While at the school I climbed a very rickety ladder to take a look in the attic. As I crawled across the bending ceiling joists, I came across a pile of medicine bottles. How they got there, or why, I have no idea. I took off my shirt and pulled loose a hanging wire to use as a rope and began lowering the bottles to the floor below, where the building’s owner unloaded them. After the many bundles were sent down, the cache was safe after so many years waiting to be discovered. My half of the discoveries are now at the doctor’s office. Somewhat later on I found a wood exam table, and a Civil War-era leather and wood dentist chair. I also stopped by an older lady’s home where she was having a sale of her parent’s belongings. I purchased a doctor’s bag and other equipment from her, then I noticed the outdoor sign for her father’s office, “Doc. Rielly. Physician & Surgeon”. She donated the sign and his medical diploma to the museum. Most recently a wheelchair has been donated. It dates to the 1860s, is made of wood and wicker, and is full-sized for a man or largish woman. It may have been used by a veteran of that time and war. I also have two, foot-powered dentist drills, and several dentist school graduation diploma’s I retrieved from a dumpster at a farm. Another thing I particularly like in the office is the straw tick bed. Many years ago I used to visit an old-time antique dealer (he’s long-closed now). One visit I found a very old straw tick (which is a sort of 6-foot pillow stuffed with straw) in the back corner of his shop attic. They were an early form of mattress. It fit nicely on a narrow day bed I also acquired years ago. I’ve been collecting equipment for the office for some time now, and I’m very happy to be able to finally display it.
.
Doc. Wagner was the much loved Richfield doctor who died in the early 1950s. He had made a late-night emergency visit, and on his way home fell asleep. He did not survive the crash at the bottom of Hinckley Hill on 303.
.

Comments are closed.